The Comic Bloc Forums

Go Back   The Comic Bloc Forums > General Talk > Comic Announcements, Discussions, News and Rumors

Comic Announcements, Discussions, News and Rumors Thoughts, reviews, interview links and rumors

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 8th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #1
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default Weekly Review Power Rankings 6/4/08

With Newsarama now going all buggers on everyone, I've decided to start reposting these reviews on ComicBloc as well. If everyone digs them, I'll start posting them here on a regular basis once again.

Cheers,

Ryan


Welcome to another installment of the Weekly Review Power Rankings. For this unfamiliar with the format, I preRank all of the week’s books that I plan to pick up based upon Diamond’s weekly shipping list, taking into consideration the creative team, previous issues, preview pages, and solicitations. Once I’ve read all of the books, I create the final Rankings based upon how they actually turned out. Below are this week’s Power Rankings. The numbers in parentheses represent where the book was preRanked. Let me know what you all think and feel free to post your own list. I attempt to keep everything as spoiler free as possible, but keep in mind that there may be the occasional minor spoiler that I overlook. If you have any questions about the Rankings or just want to drop me a line, you can email me at [email protected] or you can always PM me through the message boards. I have been asked recently if I accept review copies; I most certainly will. Any book sent to me will be reviewed. Just drop me a line if you want me to check out your book. I’d be glad to give it a look.
-Ryan “the Iowan”
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wizard World Chicago is only three weeks away, meaning that this summer is already moving way too fast. As a heads up, the Rankings will be very brief that week, as I’ll be furiously packing for the convention and then heading out to Chicago that Thursday.
On a totally unrelated note, you really must hunt down a newspaper and read today’s Pooch Café, which features a surprise guest appearance by Galactus. You won’t regret it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
15. Young X-Men #3 (11)
Written by Marc Guggenheim
Art by Yanick Paquette (pencils), Ray Snyder (inks), Kris Justice (inks), and Rob Schwager (colors)
Letters by Dave Sharpe
Cover by Terry Dodson and Rachel Dodson
Young X-Men is a title with a ton of potential that just doesn’t seem to know how to get to that higher plateau. This week’s issue is full of a lot of great moments, such as Magma’s interesting way of taking out Dust, the revelation of Ink’s true alliances, and a lot of character development for Wolfcub. Unfortunately, none of these moments really come together thanks to awkward transitions and a very stale plot. Outside of having a pretty lame major villain not really doing anything, the plot hinges on the Young X-Men hunting down former X-Men for no clear reason. Guggenheim has nailed the character writing on this, but the plot keeps going in circles and has yet to establish itself. After three issues, I’m still not sure why anything is happening and with the betrayer of the team already revealed, there is almost no tension in the story whatsoever. Yanick Paquette, who is an extremely capable artist, seems to be having similar troubles. His art is extremely uneven and lacks the energy I’d normally associate with him. This issue is extremely stiff looking and expressionless. For as good as this series could and should be, I’m just not very impressed with this issue. I’ve got a lot of faith in this creative team (as it has one of my favorite writers and a very talented artist), but things just aren’t coming together thus far.

14. DC Special: Raven #4
Written by Marv Wolfman
Art by Damion Scott (pencil), Robert Campanella (inks), and Sigmund Torre (colors)
Letters by John J. Hill
Cover by Damion Scott, Robert Campanella, and Sigmund Torre
It’s very strange how Damion Scott can simultaneously be the best and worst points about this series. On one hand, his highly energetic, graffiti-inspired art is a perfect fit for the tone of this series and brings an uneasy, youthful energy to the book that really fits with what Raven is going through as she tackles the life of a “normal” teenager. On the other hand, the art simply gets too busy for the style presented, which takes away from how strong the storytelling is. There are times in this issue where Scott’s art looks messy and the events of the issue are hard to follow. While this isn’t the most engaging story, some consistency and control in the art could really propel it up the Rankings. This week’s issue in particular suffers from this, as Wolfman’s writing is getting back to form with strong characterization. The dialogue is still riddled with clichés and ineffective bits, but I’m surprised at how well Wolfman can still write a contemporary teen over 20 years after he built his career on it. Overall, this issue pushes the plot forward in some interesting ways, but the art really betrays the accomplishments too often to place this one any higher. Fans of the character (like myself) are still going to dig this, but casual fans beware.

13. Nova #14 (03)
Written by Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning
Art by Wellinton Alves (pencils), Scott Hanna (inks), and Guru eFX (colors)
Letters by Cory Petit
Cover by Alex Maleev
This week’s Nova is an uncharacteristically weak issue for the series, but don’t let the placement on the Rankings fool you, as this is still a really strong #13. Abnett and Lanning, as always, nail their characterization of Nova and use this issue to show his commitment to justice that is borderline insane. It’s classic Nova through and through, though there are points in the issue where he comes across as completely clueless to the massive amounts of destruction around him. The premise of this issue, which centers on Nova confronting the Silver Surfer over Galactus’s need to feed is a strong one, but unfortunately, Surfer and Galactus are almost meaningless in the story. They are a major threat, but only insofar as the story needs a major threat to counterbalance Nova’s afore-mentioned commitment to justice. This really weakens the tension of the issue and I think it takes these characters for granted. They are too rich and open up too many possibilities to be relegated to plot-devices. The art by Wellinton Alves is as great as ever with a ton of energy and a great handle on the action, but the inks by Scott Hanna are all over the place on this issue. In some places, the inking is extremely tight, while in others there are unnecessary and inexplicable shadows and other heavy ink spots. It gives the book a very uneven look that hampers the effectiveness of the art. In the end, its great to see Nova and the Silver Surfer go at it and I loves me some Galactus, but this is a very weak issue for this series, which is one of Marvel’s best books. Approach this one with caution!

12. Nightwing #145 (12)
Written by Peter Tomasi
Art by Rags Morales (pencils), Michael Bair (inks), and Nathan Eyring (colors)
Letters by Sal Cipriano
Cover by Andy Kubert
Nightwing continues to straddle the line between greatness and mediocrity with this week’s issue, which continues the “Freefall” storyline. Things really pick up for the plot as we see the villain’s motivations and get perhaps the best use of the Mother of Champions since her debut in 52. There is some excellent interaction between the Nightwing and the rest of the “Bat-guys” (Batman, Robin, and Alfred) that is some of Tomasi’s best character writing yet. Unfortunately, the plot here keeps running in circles and has yet to catch my attention. I just can’t get into this one and I think that’s because the villain’s aims and personality are so generic, even if his means aren’t. Plus SPOILER ALERT, Ra’s al Ghul escapes Arkham in this issue, which makes me wonder what the point of resurrecting him, killing him again, giving him a new body, and then imprisoning him was. Seriously, what gives? END SPOILER ALERT. The art by Rags Morales is easily his best since joining the title, though I really think that he needs a stronger colorist. Nathan Eyring has the skills to enhance the art, but his style of coloring differs too much throughout the issue. On some pages (particularly anything involving close-ups of Nightwing), the art looks very rounded and rendered, but in others the coloring is extremely flat and two-dimensional. Eyring really needs to find one coloring style and stick to it. I suppose if I could get into the plot, I’d be much happier with this issue, as Tomasi and Morales are heading in the right direction, but I’m just not enjoying this storyline or this issue as much as I think I could.

11. Trinity #1 (10)
Lead Story Written by Kurt Busiek
Lead Story Art by Mark Bagley (pencils), Art Thibert (inks), and Pete Pantazis (colors)
Lead Story Letters by Pat Brosseau
Backup Written by Kurt Busiek and Fabian Nicieza
Backup Art by Scott McDaniel (pencils), Andy Owens (inks), and Allen Passalqua (colors)
Backup Letters by Pat Brosseau
Cover by Carlos Pacheco
Truthfully, I’m really not sure what to make of the debut of DC’s new weekly series, Trinity. Lead writer Kurt Busiek has a great handle on the main characters and a very fun take on their relationship (how great is it to see Batman and Superman joking around?), but the plot is so vague at this point, that its really hard to tell how much I’m going to enjoy this one. The lead story has excellent character writing and its not nearly as depressing or ridiculously convoluted as the Final Crisis stuff, so its likely that I’ll stick around for a while, but this plot is going to have to tighten and pick up in a hurry to keep this one on my pull list. The backup, which reexamined the setup from the lead from a different point of view, continued the vagueness, but did a good job of establishing one of the two new characters introduced here. Both Busiek and Fabian Nicieza do a great job with the dialogue and setting things up, but there isn’t enough substance to the plot in either story to really be effective. The art in the lead by Mark Bagley is great when its on, but there moments of stiffness and awkward anatomy (check out the page of Wonder Woman in costume or Clark Kent’s face to see what I mean) that brought the art down. The worst part of the issue, however, was the art in the backup by Scott McDaniel and Andy Owens. McDaniel’s designs are so haphazard and so poorly constructed that I can hardly believe it. Owens’s inks are consistent in terms of style, but there is little he can do to salvage McDaniel’s work here. Given how great McDaniel used to be, this issue just continues the trend from Countdown: Arena. In the end, this is an uneven debut that has some great character work, a confusing plot, and varied artwork. There is a lot of promise here and the character writing is so strong that this one is still worth checking out. I think that its really worth noting here that, under normal circumstances, by #10 on the Rankings, we still haven’t hit the good stuff.

Books this far down the Rankings are generally fairly mediocre, but this week is so strong that from this point forward, all of these books get very strong recommendations and are worth picking up. This was an absolutely tremendous week, perhaps the best overall thus far in 2008. So, please, don’t let the numbers fool you! -Ryan

10. The Boys #19 (06)
Written by Garth Ennis
Art by Darick Robertson (pencils and inks) and Tony Avina (colors)
Letters by Simon Bowland
Cover by Darick Robertson
This week’s The Boys is a very strange issue that begins laying out the secrets behind nearly every character in the series, but in true Garth Ennis fashion, raises more questions than it answers. There are mysteries on top of mysteries as the Legend explains the history of Vought-American to Hughie, the Butcher and Homelander have an uneasy confrontation, and Annie finds out the truth behind Lamp Lighter’s “disappearance.” This is clearly a turning point in the series as we learn a lot of background in a short amount of time, but there are almost too many unanswered questions in this issue that throws the entire thing out of balance. Its hard to focus on what is being said when there is so much left unsaid. Still, this issue is sheer quality with great dialogue, some surprising character developments, and a ton of new threads for Ennis to pick up on in the future. Darick Robertson showcases some of his grittiest art in this issue, but with surgical precision as he straddles a number of time periods, and uses subtle differences in design for each of the issues three subplots. Overall, this is easily the best #10 issue of the year and another win for The Boys.
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #2
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default

09. Justice Society of America #16 (08)
Story by Geoff Johns and Alex Ross
Written by Geoff Johns
Art by Fernando Pasarin (pencils), Rebecca Buchman (inks), and Hi-Fi (colors)
Letters by Rob Leigh
Cover by Alex Ross
I can honestly say that I really didn’t see the events of this week’s Justice Society of America coming. Picking up from last issue’s “debut” of Gog, God of the Third World, this week’s issue explores Gog’s apparent origin and his powers as the Justice Society confronts him. There is a strong theme of resurrection and healing that runs through the issue, with Gog showing that he “comes in peace” by showing extreme benevolence to the sick and wounded. Johns does a great job of balancing the “too good to be true” with cynicism through Damage’s angst (which is then turned on its head by the end of the issue) and a great Faith versus Science approach with Amazing-Man and Mr. Terrific. The interaction between these two is well handled and one of the highlights of the issue. Fernando Pasarin tackles the art chores and does well enough to carry the story. There is nothing exceptional about the art, but Pasarin has a good handle on the characters and “acts” them well through his fairly standard panel choices. The highlight of the issue, however, is the incredibly awesome return of SPOILER ALERT Black Adam END SPOILER ALERT, who kicks all sorts of ass in this issue during his very brief scene. In the end, this issue is a huge step forward for this story, which has been spinning its wheels for quite some time now. The art isn’t quite at the level I expect from this title and the opening narration works as a plot device only, which holds the issue down a bit, but this is still a great read with plenty of unexpected, yet very welcome twists.

08. Invincible Iron Man #2 (05)
Written by Matt Fraction
Art by Salvador Larroca (art) and Frank D’Armata (colors)
Letters by Chris Eliopoulos
Covers by Brandon Peterson and Salvador Larocca
I was extremely impressed with last month’s Invincible Iron Man #1, so I had high expectations for this week’s second issue. I’m pleased to say that I was not disappointed in the slightest. Matt Fraction, Future King of Marvel Comics, writes this issue with razor-sharp characterization from start to finish. He understands the characters inside and out, making every line of dialogue effective, especially in the case of Pepper’s relationship with Tony Stark, which is by far the highlight of the issue. Their back-and-forth is full of life and subtlety. The plot of the issue is also quite engaging, a great premise of Stark being so busy with so many responsibilities that he fails to see the bigger picture, which Zeke Stane capitalizes on by using Stark-technologies to arm various terrorist organizations. There’s a great sense of the old being replaced by the new in the plot that this issue really capitalizes on. In addition to that, we get a great cameo by Thor that is incredibly well-handled and sets the stage for more confrontations between Iron Man and Thor to come. There is a ton of ground covered in this issue and there isn’t a single moment that feels wasted. By all intents and purposes, based upon writing alone, this should be a Top 5 comic. Unfortunately, I’m really not liking the art by Salvador Larocca. His art is incredibly stiff, doesn’t always match up with the tone of the writing, and looks extremely lightboxed. I’m not sure if Larocca is a lightbox artist and I’m don’t want to point fingers, but it really does appear that way through much of the issue. The problem is, when he is drawing the more fantastic elements that couldn’t be traced (such as Iron Man or exploding terrorists), the art is so much better. I’d really like to see Larocca run free with his creativity on this title, as it would yield much better results. In the end, based upon writing alone, this is a can’t miss issue, but be prepared to be disappointed with the art.


07. Detective Comics #845 (14)
Written by Paul Dini
Art by Dustin Nguyen (pencils), Derek Fridolfs (inks), and John Kalisz (colors)
Letters by Randy Gentile
Cover by Dustin Nguyen
Detective Comics continues to live up to its reputation of being the “fun” Batman comic with this week’s issue, which centers around Batman and the Riddler’s race to solve a series of baffling “serial” murders. Paul Dini’s incredible sense of character shines in this issue, with the Riddler’s hubris taking center stage. Of all of the great things that Dini has done since taking over this title in 2006, his reinterpretation of the Riddler as a spotlight-grabbing detective is by far my favorite; this issue is a great example of why. There are also fun cameo appearances by Detective Chimp and Catwoman that are well-written, though Catwoman’s appearance is too fleeting to be effective, as it doesn’t really affect the story. The issue ends on a high-note with Batman and the Riddler facing-off over the lives that they had damaged, which was a brilliant scene and well worth the cover price of this issue. Dustin Nguyen continues to refine and redefine his artistic style, taking a very Darwyn Cooke-meets-Mike Mignola approach in this issue. It’s a strange combination, but it looks great and is a strong fit for the story. There are still some consistency issues through the art, but as Nguyen continues to develop this new style, these problems have decreased. In the end, this issue is a lot of fun and a great done-in-one story that is yet another reminder as to why this title is so much better than Morrison’s Batman.

06. Amazing Spider-Man #561 (13)
Written by Dan Slott
Art by Marcos Martin (art) and Javier Rodriguez (colors)
Letters by Cory Petit
Cover by Marcos Martin
This week’s Amazing Spider-Man #561 closes out the current story arc with style and is one of the best issues the title has scene in the last several months. In the issue, Spider-Man is faced with the ethical dilemma of his new gig as a paparazzo while having to take out the obsessive and dangerous Paper Doll. Unbeknownst to him, he’s actually save none other than Mary Jane Watson, who made her return last issue. Dan Slott put together an incredibly fun script for this issue, with some strong banter between MJ and Spidey, some great twists (such as Jackpot’s return), and a wealth of solid character interaction between Peter and his friends. In the end, the dialogue and interaction is so good that it really reminds the readers of why we like Spider-Man and Peter Parker so much (I was personally cheering when he finally stood up for himself at The DB). Marcos Martin, who has disappointed me over the last few issues, returns to form with great consistency and a wonderful “throwback” style that borrows much from the Silver Age. In the end, this looks to be a turning point for the series due to the issues major changes that finally come to fruition and there are a ton of plot threads left hanging for the series rotating writing staff to pick up in the coming months. After a few months of disappointment, this title is picking up steam once again with this fantastic issue. Even if you haven’t followed this story over the previous two issues, this one should not be missed!

05. Secret Invasion #3 (07)
Written by Brian Michael Bendis
Art by Lenil Yu (pencils), Mark Morales (inks), and Laura Martin (colors)
Letters by Chris Eliopoulos
Cover by Gabrielle Dell’Otto
Secret Invasion is really turning out to be exactly what I want in an “event” comic. It’s got a ton of characters, lots of action, loads of surprises, and the very real possibility of changing the face of an entire line of comics. It follows a formula that worked for Civil War and World War Hulk, but this issue makes me believe that Secret Invasion could actually surprise Marvel’s previous event efforts. This issue is the perfect “summer blockbuster” comic. With the Skrulls invading New York, much of the issue is dedicated to chaotic action as the Young Avengers and the Initiative attempt to stop the invaders. Things go from bad to worse to potentially promising on this front as the Skrulls smack everyone around before the return of one of my absolute favorite Marvel characters potentially tips the scales (its pretty clear who it is, but I won’t spoil it for you). Bendis does a great job of using the Young Avengers and the Initiative to further the action here, but also provides just enough insight on the characters that readers could use this issue as a springboard to checking out the characters in their respective books. Lenil Yu rocks out incredibly hard on the art through this scene, with high-energy action that is full of impact and some of the most off-the-wall designs I’ve seen all year. This is a gorgeous fight scene from start to finish. The coup de grace for this issue, though, is the incredible twist involving Tony Stark. This twist, which I really want to spoil, but I won’t, turns the entire Secret Invasion on its head as it becomes clear that nothing and no one are safe from the Skrulls. Whether or not this “reveal” turns out to be true, the sense of doubt and paranoia it adds to the storyline is astounding and it is played out so well thanks to the very effective script and some of Lenil Yu’s most expressive pages yet. This is easily one of the year’s best twists and it makes Secret Invasion #3 a can’t miss issue (even without the awesome battle scene, which is also well worth picking up).

04. Robin/Spoiler Special (09)
Lead and Backup Stories Written by Chuck Dixon
Lead Story Art by Rafael Albuquerque (art) and Chris Peter (colors)
Lead Story Letters by Sal Cipriano
Backup Art by Victor Ibanez
Backup Letters by Sal Cipriano
Cover by Rafael Albuquerque and Chris Peter
I hereby demand a Spoiler series written by Chuck Dixon and drawn by Rafael Albuquerque. If you’ve read this issue, you are going to agree with me. It’s that good. This special covers two stories that combine to be the perfect introduction to Stephanie “Spoiler” Brown that is just as satisfying for new readers as it is for longtime fans of the character. The lead story follows Spoiler and Robin on a superheroics filled “date” that helps establish the character as she was prior to her “death.” We see her impulsiveness, edginess, and willingness to take risks to get the job done that separates her from other teen heroes. It’s standard fare for fans of the character, but its an incredibly enjoyable story thanks to Dixon’s sharp characterization that absolutely nails the relationship between Spoiler and Robin, but also sets up potential problems between the characters thanks to Tim’s off-again, on-again girlfriend Zoanne. Blue Beetle artist Rafael Albuquerque handles the art chores in this story and is simply amazing. He is easily amongst the best artists working today and this is one of his strongest efforts of the year. It’s so fluid and controlled, with great expressions and fantastic storytelling. The lead story alone makes this issue worth picking up. The backup story takes a different route, showing Spoiler’s time in Africa before returning to Gotham, focusing on her sense of justice and heroic instincts. It also shows a newfound maturity that hadn’t been with character before, but its set up so well that Dixon will be able to run with it in the Robin series without betraying the character’s core. Victor Ibanez provides the art in the back up and it looks great, but it lacks the energy of the lead story, so the issue ends on a bit of a down note. Still, it looks decent and fits the tone, so Ibanez’s art does very little to damage this very stellar issue. In a week filled with amazing issues, The Robin/Spoiler Special is amongst the best comics you’ll find this week and should not be missed.

03. Criminal #2 (01)
Written by Ed Brubaker
Art by Sean Phillips (art) and Val Staples (colors)
Letters by Sean Phillips
Cover by Sean Phillips
Criminal returns this week with another brilliant done-in-one character study, following in the footsteps of the previous two issues and offering another unique point-of-view for the world that the series inhabits. Writer Ed Brubaker is the undisputed king of world-building and this issue is yet another great example of why. Though the story focuses on young girl in love turned junkie Danica, her story parallels those of previously introduced characters, adding more depth to the issues that have come before, while still providing information that will clearly play into stories yet to come. Through her fall into ruin and eventual ascent towards revenge, Brubaker builds disgust and sympathy towards her through his spot on dialogue and first person narration. As the story jump cuts from scene to scene, it becomes increasingly clear that she isn’t the most reliable of narrators, but that makes her story all the more tragic. As always, Sean Phillips puts a tremendous amount of vitality and emotion into every panel, combining with the believable characters to make the book feel alive. Through the art, you can practically taste the acrid sense of tragedy that permeates the world this title inhabits. It’s that ‘effing good. Val Staples continues to be the unsung hero for this title by accenting Phillips art with his lucid colors that are just subdued enough to blend in worth the murky line work, but just bold enough to eye catching. This issue of Criminal, as with every issue that came before, is the real deal. It’s a razor-sharp character study that seeps into all that surrounds it, helping develop the disturbing, yet undeniably engaging world of Criminal. It’s also $3.50 that you will not regret spending.
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #3
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default

02. Kick-Ass #3 (04)
Written by Mark Millar
Art by John Romita Jr. (pencils), Tom Palmer (inks), and Dean white (colors)
Letters by Chris Eliopoulos
Cover by John Romita Jr.
The ever-interesting and ever-controversial Kick-Ass dropped its third issue this week with yet another finely crafted book. Mark Millar and John Romita continue their exercise in brutality from cover-to-cover with this issue, only now adding an emotional layer that is just as gut wrenching as the violence that the book has become known for. This issue follows the title character’s rise to fame after his exploits are caught on camera and broadcast around the world. The book then takes an unexpected turn from a character study to an exploration of the modern celebrity, with depth being added by the main character’s fame and by those that idolize him for his actions. The most interesting part? He keeps getting more despicable. His lies compound, his bravado becomes from self-involved, and the depths that he is willing to go to reach new lows through this issue. And yet, I haven’t been this intrigued by someone that is so completely unlikable since the last time I read Millar’s Wanted. That’s a huge compliment coming from me. It’s really hard to say anything about the art because its John Romita Jr. You know that its gorgeous without me telling you, just like you know how consistent it is and how it sucks you into the story without reservation and refuses to let go until you’ve poured over each and every page. There is a strange break in the realism of the series, both in terms of art and writing with the ending, which veers off into Kill Bill Vol. 1 levels of exaggerated violence, but the writing and the art so much in sync that you won’t bat an eye until you’ve put the book down and mulled over the disturbing vision that these two masters have forced upon you with this issue. In the end, this is the best issue thus far in this fledgling series. If you’ve got the stomach for it, there are few books as disgustingly satisfying and brutally honest as Kick-Ass. This issue is no exception and should not be missed.

01. Manhunter #31 (02)
Written by Marc Andreyko
Art by Michael Gaydos (art) and Jose Villarrubia (colors)
Letters by Sal Cipriano
Cover by Liam Sharp
I only have on thing to say about this week’s Manhunter #31: about damn time.
Okay, I lied, I have more. The incredibly awesome, criminally under-read, never-say-die-unless-its-to-a-supervillain Manhunter made its glorious return to comic shops everywhere this week and has not lost a single step in its absence. Writer Marc Andreyko opens this issue with a great two-page review of the character and her supporting cast before jumping head-first into reestablishing the current Manhunter, Kate Spencer, by putting her in a brutal battle against the Atomic Skull. It’s not the most glorious of introductory fights, but it establishes her relative inexperience as a hero, her incredible persistence, penchant for violence, and her reliance on her tech-guy, Dylan, who has a history of working for some of the DCU’s most notorious supervillains. From there, its straight into several plot threads, picking up Kate’s ever-messed up family life and a series of mysterious disappearances and murders in Mexico. The issue is very accessible to new readers as Andreyko builds everything from the ground up and is such a superb character writer that he wastes little time with introductions and establishment, but will in no way bore longtime fans of the series. Not surprisingly, Andreyko touches upon modern politics and puts the story deep into moral dilemmas, which is nothing new for this complex and intelligent series. Oh yeah, and one of my absolute favorite non-A-list heroes makes a surprise guest appearance. It’s like Marc Andreyko thought, “Hey, how can I make Ryan the Iowan even happier about the return of one of DC’s greatest series of the modern age?” Well, Mr. Andreyko, you nailed it. I was a little leary about Michael Gaydos providing the art for the series, as I’ve always been on the fence with his work. However, this series really benefits from his style. The hyper-realistic art is a complete departure from DC’s general artistic direction, which serves to highlight how unique this series is. Given the subject matter and the tone, his realism is right at home, but he never falters when it comes to the superheroics and other more fantastic elements. He proves in this issue that he is a great fit for this series and is just one more reason why you should not under any circumstances miss this issue. This was a phenomenal week for comics, but none of them could deliver on all levels in the way that Manhunter #31 does. That’s why, despite so many other great issues this week, this is my choice for Book of the Week. Do not miss this one!
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2008   BART ALLEN is offline   #4
BART ALLEN's Avatar
BART ALLEN
pre 52 and proud of it

 
joined: Dec 2004
Location: GReenville nc
Posts: 5,563

Default

I think you are being a bit unfair to Trinity , say that nothing has happened in part 1 of a 52 part story is not giving it time to happen.

I think the character bits were enough for the book to be great alone
 
Looking for the light in a land of forever night
Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #5
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default

I think you are being a bit unfair to Trinity , say that nothing has happened in part 1 of a 52 part story is not giving it time to happen.

I think the character bits were enough for the book to be great alone
ddf
BART ALLEN View Post
The character bits were fantastic. I'm glad to see Busiek take a lighter approach to the Big Three that is still compatible with most of their characterizations outside of this book (with the exception of Morrison's Batman, which is completely unlike any other in-continuity take on the character currently running).

My problem isn't that "nothing happened" in this issue, its that it seemed like the writers were going out of their way to avoid being clear on anything. This is only part 1 of 52 and I understand they can't give anything away, but they were being so purposely vague in this issue that it made the entire issue feel unnatural.
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2008   Wg2100s is offline   #6
Wg2100s's Avatar
Wg2100s
Neo Geoffan

 
joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 295

Default

Welcome back, Ye ole Iowa.I sorely missed your reviews in this forum.
 
Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #7
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default

Welcome back, Ye ole Iowa.I sorely missed your reviews in this forum.
ddf
Wg2100s View Post
Thanks Wg! I was posting both here and on Newsarama, but stopped here when there was very little discussion and it didn't look like I was getting much for a readership. But, after their horrible relaunch at Newsarama, their Reviews area is a ghost town, so I decided to try my luck over here again.

Thanks again for checking the reviews out. You keep reading them, and I'll keep posting them!
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2008   Ye Olde Iowa is offline   #8
Ye Olde Iowa's Avatar
Ye Olde Iowa
Member

 
joined: Jun 2007
Location: Dubuque, IA
Posts: 176

Default

For this interested, here are this week's preRankings:

14. Titans #3
13. Trinity #2
12. Green Lantern Corps #25
11. Amazing Spider-Man #562
10. Green Arrow/Black Canary #9
09. Action Comics #866
08. Wonder Woman #21
07. Batman Confidential #18
06. Booster Gold #10
05. Gotham Underground #9
04. Huntress: Year One #3
03. Drafted #8
02. Elephantmen #12
01. Sky Doll #2

It's another really dense week, with a ton of great books coming out. I'll also be picking up Tiny Titans #5, though I'm not sure if I'll review that or not (but trust me, it will be worth picking up). I'm on the fense about Secret Invasion: Who Do You Trust?, so don't be surprised if that ends up on the Rankings. Also, unfortunately, I cannot make any promises about being able to snag a copy of Sky Doll, as I'm sure my shop will have short-ordered once again. If I don't get it this week, I'll run a catch-up review as soon as I can.

Be sure to check back Thursday for the full reviews and Rankings!
 
Check out the Weekly Review Power Rankings, counting down the best comics of the week, each and every week in the General Talk forum!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
©2000-2008 Comic Bloc All characters and titles are © by their respective owners.